28 Things Everybody Should Know, Part XIX

Users expect navigation either above or to the left of the content.

More often than not, when a user visits a website, the purpose for visiting–a certain bit of information, for example–isn’t on the first page of the site. Users generally have to click around before reaching the functional, meaty part of the experience, and the faster users can find the desired links and get started, the less chance a site has of chasing them away prematurely.

Because the English language reads from left to right and top to bottom, users are naturally inclined to scan for useful navigation starting in the upper left hand corner and moving either right along the top, or down along the left. (That’s once the user’s decided to move on to another page, of course. Large splash images and other content usually grab the user’s initial attention, but when it’s time to move on, our instincts tell us to head for that upper left corner.) The layout of the page, in much the way a painting directs the viewer’s eye around its canvas, has a large impact on where the eye moves from that starting point in the corner: a prominent horizontal row of buttons along the top will imply that the most utilized navigation will be included in that row, while a column of buttons down the left side will tell users to scan downward first.

LiveJournal uses a horizontal navigation along the top of the page, where rolling over a menu item will bring up a submenu underneath. Placing the site’s logo in the upper left corner assures users that this corner is a good starting point in searching for common navigation and functionality.

YouTube’s navigation is spread around the site a bit more, with video-specific functions to the right of a video’s playback area. This helps keep videos within the browser window, for user like me whose windows aren’t big enough to include the video and the options and links all at the same time. But still, the most commonly used buttons–or at least the most helpful buttons for novice users who don’t know their way around yet–are in the upper left, with user account options in the upper right.

A good example of a site with navigation on the left of the page is Hoogerbrugge, a site full of experimental presentations and animations. Anticipating most users’ ability to scroll or, at the very least, hit the Page Down button if necessary, Hoogerbrugge has large menu buttons with accompanying illustrations, clearly stating that the most important part of the site is waiting just on the other side of these buttons.

There are many reasons to break this pattern of navigation, especially when the architecture of a site’s content interacts with the menu–good examples are LEOGEO and Semillero, both sites that feature the navigation as an experience in itself. Other sites, especially those that rely on advertising revenue, need users to stick around a while before heading for the menu, and have a reason to be sneaky with their button placement (but not too sneaky, or users might give up and never return). But aside from this and artistic experimentation–which isn’t necessary as often as many designers want to believe–users want their browsing experiences to be as fast and painless as possible, and managing the navigation of a site with the understanding of where the human eye is conditioned to look will make everything run a little smoother.

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